ICRC

Interdisciplinary Ceramics Research Center


The Interdisciplinary Ceramic Research Center (ICRC) is a new laboratory for individuals and teams across disciplines to experiment with traditional and cutting-edge approaches to the manipulation of clay. In recent years we have seen renewed interest in the potential of ceramics among architects, designers, engineers and artists outside of the traditional ceramic arts. The Center provides interested parties with the opportunity to explore their research with access to specialized equipment in a collaborative work environment.

The ICRC is grounded in the notion that unstructured exchange of ideas can lead to groundbreaking research and creative work. This is best facilitated by offering a flexible workspace; MIT Building 20 or Bell Labs are examples of such shared institutional spaces paving the way for historic discovery and progress. The ICRC is positioned to do for the arts what these examples have done for science and engineering.

Both undergraduate and graduate students have the opportunity to work with and alongside KU professors, technicians, visiting artists, and visiting scholars. The Chamney kilns, an industrial mold press, a CNC router, and a large-scale ceramic 3D printer already establish the ICRC as a leading facility in the United States. Serving as an intersection of ceramic-related research, teaching, and learning, the ICRC places Lawrence and the University of Kansas at the heart of a forward-looking movement in ceramic art.

 

People

Marshall Maude  Associate Professor, Associate Chair

Marshall Maude is a ceramic artist and Associate Professor of Ceramics at the University of Kansas. He has exhibited his work in solo and group shows nationally and in China, Denmark, Korea, and New Zealand. Marshall has been an artist-in-residence at the Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute in Jingdezhen, China, and at Guldagergaard – International Ceramic Research Center in Denmark. His most recent solo exhibitions include the Leedy-Voulkos Art Center ‘16, NAU Museum of Art ‘17, Lanning Gallery ’18, and the Cube Gallery, Naropa University ’20.Marshall Maude is a ceramic artist and Associate Professor of Ceramics at the University of Kansas. He has exhibited his work in solo and group shows nationally and in China, Denmark, Korea, and New Zealand. Marshall has been an artist-in-residence at the Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute in Jingdezhen, China, and at Guldagergaard – International Ceramic Research Center in Denmark. His most recent solo exhibitions include the Leedy-Voulkos Art Center ‘16, NAU Museum of Art ‘17, Lanning Gallery ’18, and the Cube Gallery, Naropa University ’20.

 


 

Sarah Gross  Assistant Professor

Sarah Gross grew up in a small apartment in densely populated New York City. Her work explores physical closeness and emotional distance. Her ceramic sculpture and installation reveals a discomfort with, and longing for intimacy. She earned her MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and her BA from Carleton College. She has completed residencies at c.r.e.t.a Rome, Green Olive Arts, Morocco, Greenwich House Pottery, and the Lawrence Arts Center. Sarah shows her work nationally and internationally and is included in numerous collections including the U.S. Department of State, The University of Costa Rica, and the Shiwan Ceramics Museum in Foshan, China.

 


 

Keith Van de Riet Associate Professor

Keith Van de Riet joined University of Kansas Architecture in fall of 2015. He received his doctorate in Architectural Sciences from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2012 with a focus in Built Ecologies, a program co-hosted by The Center for Architecture, Science and Ecology and Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, LLP in New York City. Prior to joining KU, he was teaching and conducting research at Florida Atlantic University, with research activities that include collaborative development of coastal structures to promote ecological services alongside urban development. His research experience includes development of engineered-natural structures, simulation and analysis of environmental systems and prototype testing and development. He received his B.Arch from KU in 2004.

 


 

Steve Gurysh  Associate Professor

Steve Gurysh is an artist who works fluidly between sculpture, digital fabrication, time-based media, and site-specific gestures to explore environmental systems, machinic behavior, and geological contexts. His research compresses expansive narratives into potent objects and experiences often containing wild materialities and speculative relationships to time. His project-based works are often developed in collaboration and correspondence with scientists, engineers, other artists, and non-human participants.

He has been the recipient of numerous awards, including residencies at the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, the WATERSHED+ Dynamic Environment Lab and a fellowship at the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry. He has exhibited works at Contemporary Calgary in Alberta, Canada; the Knockdown Center in Queens, New York; W139, Amsterdam; El Museo de la Ciudad, Quer‌‌étaro, Mexico; La Soci‌ét‌é des Arts Technologiques, Montréal; The Engine Room, Wellington, New Zealand; and in the center of the Allegheny River.

Gurysh is an Associate Professor of Sculpture in the Department of Visual Art at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, KS.

 


 

Yoonmi Nam  Professor

Yoonmi Nam’s work considers cross-cultural experiences and a sense of transience through observations of everyday objects and occurrences. Born and raised in Seoul, South Korea, Nam earned a BFA from Hong-Ik University in Seoul and an MFA from RISD in Providence, USA. Her work is in the collections of the RISD Museum, RI; Spencer Museum of Art, KS; and the Beach Museum of Art, KS; among others, and has shown her work in over 20 solo exhibitions and 180 group exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Currently, she teaches at the University of Kansas, where she has been a faculty member since 2001.

 


 

Brandi Lee Cooper  Art at the Intersection of Science Artist-in-Residence

Brandi Lee Cooper is a 4th generation Arizona native. She has always had a love affair with wild creatures and untamed places. She holds a BS in Zoology from Northern Arizona University and an MFA in Ceramics from Arizona State University. She is currently the Art at the Intersection of Science Resident Artist and teaches Art and Ecology classes at the University of Kansas.

 

 


 

Jonathan Christensen Caballero  ICRC Artist-in-Residence

Jonathan Christensen Caballero is an multidisciplinary artist born and raised in Utah. He received his A.S. in art from Snow College, B.F.A in ceramics and sculpture from Utah State University and M.F.A. in ceramics from Indiana University. He has exhibited nationally and internationally in venues such as the Clay Center of New Orleans in Louisiana, Standard Ceramic Supply in Pennsylvania, Carbondale Clay Center in Colorado, and Tsukuba Museum of Art in Japan. Christensen Caballero recently moved to Lawrence, KS and became the Interdisciplinary Ceramic Research Center Artist in Residence at University of Kansas. His work has been featured on the cover of Ceramics Monthly's September issue 2020 and is a recipient of the ISC Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award. Christensen’s work focuses on the human figure and advocates for the Latin American labor community.

 

Projects

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KU Architecture students in residence at the ICRC designed and installed terracotta cladding on the ICRC warehouse. Titled “Tectonic,” the installation visualizes patterns of clay formation at two scales – (1) microscopic crystalline patterns and (2) tectonic-scale cross sections that were blended to visually express the function of the otherwise unmarked warehouse. During the semester, students worked with visiting artists, industry sponsors, and ceramic students and faculty to design and install the cladding. The digital-analog hybrid workflow exposed students to a variety of fabrication techniques, including computational modeling, CNC milling and tile pressing. The project was completed with support from LaunchKU donors, NBK Terracotta, Fastenal, Bracker’s Good Earth Clays, and the KU Architecture and Ceramic Departments.
The Kansas Children’s Discovery Center (KCDC) in Topeka serves nearly 100,000 visitors each year. The philosophy on play at the Center is focused on child-led discovery and creative problem-solving, with emphasis on STEAM learning. Scheduled to be completed fall of 2021, the “Reptilian Pavilion” is a biomimetic shade structure to serve the outdoor playscape at KCDC. Reptile scales and camouflage patterns were image sampled to generate a shading pattern across several hundred ram pressed terracotta tiles. The steel structure is a hyperbolic paraboloid, where all members are straight sections of steel tubing progressively inclined over the length of the pavilion to suggest the organic curves of a reptile. KU Architecture students worked with ICRC research faculty and staff to design the terracotta tiles and develop a Ram Press mold using a digital model to fabricate the complex form. Students constructed a ½ scale mock-up prior to embarking on the full-scale shade structure in Topeka. The project is sponsored by Capitol Federal Savings Bank, McClure Engineering, KBS Constructors, AZZ Galvanizing and KU Architecture and Ceramics Departments.

Equipment

  • 30 ton industrial RAM press
  • WASP large format 3-D printer
  • Laguna CNC router w/16" Z
  • Tool room and small wood shop
  • Slab roller
  • Four electric kilns (1-30 cu. ft.)
  • Gas car kiln (54 cu.ft.)
  • Chamney Barn kiln complex with six wood burning kilns


 

 

 


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